What's with the left-mindedness?

I couldn’t help but notice that most people here are so fixated upon the technicality of things rather than the artistry, probably more so than what I’ve seen in any other CG related forum. I’m not saying it’s wrong or trying to preach at you. All I’m saying is that it’s kinda weird seeing as this should be a forum for artists. It IS called blenderartists after all !!
So what’s with this left-mindedness??? :confused:

It’s easier to give critique that way.
Beauty is in the eye of a beholder, but a mesh with perfect topology will always have perfect topology.

I think part of it has to do with the open source aspect of Blender. Many of its users are users of open source operating systems, which take technical minds to handle, usually. And the fact that the coding is close to us draws people with less of an artistic background, and more of a developer background.

edit; nevermind, misunderstood that.

second edit; postcount + 1

At times for me I can be technical and artistic, or practically think on both sides of the mind, like precise placement when putting 3D scene elemented together in relation to the camera and being artistic in putting the image together.

Or you can say the art of being technical, letting your technical mind show an artistic side.

I think art is all about the best of the tools you have. And getting the best of use of tools is to learn about it. Hence the technical.

Kbot, I’m not sure I understood that, but IF you’re saying art is defined by the tools you used to create it I would have to disagree. I would say knowledge of the tools used do give a certain perspective on the art, but by no means should be set as a main reason of understanding that art…

Wow, this train of thought could get really complicated and confusing really fast, and probably not say anything that everyone here doesn’t already know… I’m redirecting now…

The main reason I think this form is more technical is that most of the people here aren’t really good enough at using blender to just make art. Also because of the nature of blender always having the ability to do more then you know how to do, people naturally just want to keep learning.
I would also agree with what egan said, and add that sense it is open and free, the people that tend to use blender haven’t spent money (at least not as much) on profesional training of some kind, which would help explain why they’re not as good in general.

“A poor craftsman blames his tools”.
Anyone who thinks that art is all about the tools you use is…
… a tool.

There are plenty of discussions about the artistic aspects of 3d. Check the finished projects, gallery and traditional sections.
I do agree, however, that a lot of the discussions get swamped with (sometimes irrelevant) technical discussions. I’m guessing it has a lot to do with the amount of 3d newbies we get here. Since Blender is free, we seem to get a disproportionate amount of them. This is a good thing, but…
Newbies don’t often realise that art is not about the tools you use but about the ideas you’re expressing and how you choose to express them.

I agree with most of what you guys said. But I kinda feel blender has to bear its fair share of the blame. Couldn’t it be that the workflow itself in blender is rather technically inclined? The blender community prides itself for having a tool that is “designed by artists for artists”. I don’t believe this to be necessarily true. If you think about it, any commercial 3D software package has to appeal to 3D artists in order to survive in the market. Blender, on the other hand, has to appeal to no one, being the free and open source software package that it is. The way I see it, blender has turned into a playground for coders to show off their coding muscles. Of course everyone wants to implement the coolest new feature, but no one wants to worry about artist-friendliness (if there are coders who do worry they must be a minority). Freedom is by all means the greatest blessing of open source development, but it also turns out to be its worst curse, 'cause you just can’t force someone to do something they don’t want to do. Don’t get me wrong, I like new features as much as the next guy, probably even more. But can’t we implement new features that promote artistc freedom. Look at Zbrush, it’s one of the brightest examples!

http://www.zbrushcentral.com/zbc/showthread.php?t=071829

I don’t think you understand open source economics. If you want a good perspective on this go browse on sourceforge and see how many thousands of dead projects there are for every one that has managed to build a community around it.

The way I see it, blender has turned into a playground for coders to show off their coding muscles. Of course everyone wants to implement the coolest new feature, but no one wants to worry about artist-friendliness (if there are coders who do worry they must be a minority).
How many of these coders are or directly deal with actual artists in their ‘real’ jobs on a daily basis do you suppose? Not even counting the multi-page discussions on the best font spacing in a menu panel or the ‘proper’ mouse behaviour that these same coders get involved in on this here forum.

Just guessing but I would imagine that you would have to be pretty high up the food chain at a major studio to have the kind of access that a lowly blender artist has to the developers of whatever 3d app they’re using.

Freedom is by all means the greatest blessing of open source development, but it also turns out to be its worst curse, 'cause you just can’t force someone to do something they don’t want to do. Don’t get me wrong, I like new features as much as the next guy, probably even more. But can’t we implement new features that promote artistc freedom.
By ‘we’ I assume you mean someone else writing the code to provide you with this ‘artistic freedom’.

This ‘freedom’ cuts both ways unfortunately. There is absolutely nothing stopping you from getting the code and implementing whatever you feel would be valuable to yourself and other blender artists. Or paying someone to do it for you if you feel your time would be better spent doing something else…kind of like everyone else who hasn’t developed your wanted feature, eh?

I thought you were saying that we shouldn’t focus on the technical side of things?
And yet you are now asking for new features :eyebrowlift2:

Using your computer instead of brush, paint and canvas is applying a
technical mindset to art. Of course, that should not be the main focus of you artistic
endeavors
( I completely agree in that aspect of the argument ), but when you
learn to paint, you have to learn how to hold and move the brush.
You have to learn how to mix your colors, and you probably also have to
learn a lot of other theory, that may not seem very artistic at all.

And a lot of the people here are still learning. When we critique each other we
are going to mention the parts that need the most work first, and if there
are tech-errors, those will often be the most in-your-face.

But i am unsure how you define “left-mindedness”. Is it like topology discussions or
“that light is too blue”? Is it the ideas behind the works that do not get enough attention? Or is it the actual visuals that lack attention in favor of technical details?

Could you give some examples of the blender community being over-focused on
the technical side of things? I just don’t remember seeing it myself, though that could of course just mean that i myself am to tech-centered… :o