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Thread: Aquino house

  1. #1
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    Aquino house

    Hi guys,
    Here's something I did for myself between two boring Archviz jobs.
    It is based quite closely on Casa Aquino, a Mexican house by architect Augusto Fernandez Mas.
    This is the first time I've tried to do this: a whole house, fully furnished and suitable both for exterior and interior renders (the bathrooms are missing though). This is also probably the last time. It's a very inefficient way to work and it makes the rendering process much longer than it ought to be. My rig nearly collapsed under the weight of the textures, and Vray used almost 4gigs on some of the renders (even though there are many instances).
    The images use a lot of post-prod, some of which was done in the Blender node compositor, some in PShop. Of course, everything but the trees outside was modelled in Blender (the trees are a wild mixture of Xfrog commercial models and random stuff from the net, tweaked and re-textured).
    Hope you like them and, as always, happy to hear your criticism and comments.
    B


















    Last edited by BbB; 23-Nov-08 at 12:23.



  2. #2
    Member SandroP's Avatar
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    amazing ...and "crazy" (whole house ?!!? _____) Work

    ^______^

    -S-



  3. #3
    Wow, another great serie as usual.
    Very nice renderings and you really pull out some great textures and models.
    Did you still used VRay for these images ?



  4. #4
    Wow, you did really fantastic work here. I like this project the most of all your recent stuff.



  5. #5
    Member mr_archano's Avatar
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    Really amazing.
    It would be great if you can make a simple tutorial about texturing in Blender for VRay :P



  6. #6
    wow you never cease to amaze me i nned te get a house like that and a quick tutorial on texturing would be nice i seem to mess it up all the time and if i get it right it is waaay off
    If it moves it must die!



  7. #7
    Thats F*cking amazing, I saw the pictures and thougt it was real,then I checked the comments and readed that it was real, I couldn't belivieve my eyes...

    Keep up the good work man...



  8. #8
    Member weilynn's Avatar
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    Wahou !

    Amazing realism ! I think the third, fourth, fifth are the most realistic. My favourites is the fifth one.

    Really great jod, *I'm still amazed*




  9. #9
    Member Carbonflux's Avatar
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    These are just wonderful BbB thank you for sharing them they are worthy of study even. The only issues I see are with the windows, but I am not sure how to put it into words, again, maybe just too clean and thin? maybe they are perfect and I am looking to hard?

    I am amazed at your content library also, so many textures and materials, I almost feel like if I opened one of the books there would be the full content inside

    Great to see the work of a real master

    I like the texture on the floor in the one with the red chair. I also like the last two because of the "creep in the bushes" angle ( I hope these people don't have a dog ! )
    www.carbonflux.org - photographing the imagination.



  10. #10
    They're good, but... They really don't seem quite up to par as your usual renders. You can really see the rendering problems on a lot of the pics.

    All the pictures with direct sunlight, especially the first two, look way over-saturated, and the reflections on all of them look a little off. The glare on the second pic is annoying and very unrealistic, there's a lot of aliasing on the chair in the third pic, and the sunlight on the floor looks very unnatural.

    The DOF in the fifth picture looks very odd, and the kitchen table and chairs in the sixth have a very noticeable lack of shading.

    The DOF in the seventh pic is also very strange looking, and the reflections on the floor look VERY unnatural, the texture looks like it's a ceramic of some sort, but it's reflecting like a mirror. There's also some aliasing issues on the chair texture.



    Still, even after saying all that they look very good, I just feel like the lighting isn't what it could be. I'd be very interested to see some Indigo comparison pics.



  11. #11
    Member Carbonflux's Avatar
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    All the pictures with direct sunlight, especially the first two, look way over-saturated, and the reflections on all of them look a little off. The glare on the second pic is annoying and very unrealistic, there's a lot of aliasing on the chair in the third pic, and the sunlight on the floor looks very unnatural.
    This is once again back to the idea of what is artistic vs unrealistic, I did notice these things you mention also but spun them in my own mind as a attempt to play around rather then errors but it could go either way I guess, quite the gray area imo...the red chair for example looks tiny, is it? or just a trick of perspective? <hand waving>

    What I would like to see is a child's hand print on one of the windows tho or maybe the mark a dogs nose leaves
    www.carbonflux.org - photographing the imagination.



  12. #12
    Member Ace Dragon's Avatar
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    That's insane, what with modeling the entire house and the yard in great detail.

    You must have a big library of textures and an app. for plant generation to pull this off.
    Sweet Dragon dreams, lovely Dragon kisses, gorgeous Dragon hugs. How sweet would life be to romp with Dragons, teasing you with their fire and you being in their games, perhaps they can even turn you into one as well.
    Adventures in Cycles; My official sketchbook



  13. #13
    Originally Posted by Carbonflux View Post
    This is once again back to the idea of what is artistic vs unrealistic, I did notice these things you mention also but spun them in my own mind as a attempt to play around rather then errors but it could go either way I guess, quite the gray area imo...the red chair for example looks tiny, is it? or just a trick of perspective? <hand waving>

    What I would like to see is a child's hand print on one of the windows tho or maybe the mark a dogs nose leaves
    Yeah, there is some truth to that.


    But it feels to me like this was supposed to be a more photorealistic rendering, and the artistic side of things was supposed to come out in the modeling and textureing, rather than strange lighting.



  14. #14
    Member tcrazy's Avatar
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    Great work!

    I love the style that you where able to put into these image, not necessarily realistic, but It is very stylized, maybe CD will leave me alone after this :P The only thing I see is that the bed has way to many wrinkles in it. I have a couple of questions 1) is the grass displacement? 2) where do you find reference for all of this?

    Dang I just looked up the house Its amazing how close this is!
    Here's a link if anyone cares.
    Last edited by tcrazy; 23-Nov-08 at 22:53.



  15. #15
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    Hi Guys,
    Thanks a lot for the feedback.

    SandroP, llx66, weilynn: Thx guys, much appreciated.

    Enrico: Cheers! Yes, this is all Vray standalone beta via Andrey's wonderful script.

    wizofboz: Thanks. I would have like to spend more time on this, but it was really stretching my system's capabilities.

    mr_archano, Acewings06: Hi guys. I'm not sure where I'd start a tut since most of what I do is just painstaking trial and error - as opposed to applying some secrete recipe that works all the time. Plus I'm still figuring out Vray. There's so much still that doesn't behave the way I would expect it to. But I'm happy to answer questions if you're up against some specific problem. Just PM or email me.

    Carbonflux: Cheers! Yes, now that you mention that, the last one is a little creepy. The parquet and the living-room floor textures were done in Blender and made tileable in Photoshop. Modelling the parquet and using this as a texture It's the best way I've found of doing exactly the texture you need. You just need a solid, tileable wood or stone texture to start and a little bit of patience.

    Hobo Joe: Thanks for the comments man. It really helps me zero in on the main problems. It's hard to really "see" things after you've spend so much time staring at the same images. Some of what you're pointing out has to do with poor post-prod (like saturation and DOF). I think the main issue as far as I'm concerned is the "flying furniture" effect: The fact that some images don't seem to show diffuse shadows in indirectly-lit area. I'm using LDR images to light some of these images and this may be the reason (I don't get this effect when using lamps to light a scene). The GI settings are quite high on the interiors, so I can't imagine it comes from there. But you never know. As I said, I'm still kind of fumbling in the dark when it comes to Vray's render settings.
    Specular and reflectance maps also give me a headache. I never seem able to obtain the same result twice with identical settings. Sometimes (like on the leather in the first pic), they simply don't work, giving me a buggy render whatever I do...

    Carbonflux: The red chair should be about the right size. But I'm using a very long lens on this image (to justify the very shallow DOF) so there is a good deal of foreshortening going on, which might explain the impression, making the background furniture look a lot bigger than it actually is.

    Cyborg Dragon: Yes, I do have quite a few Gigabytes of textures now, and I keep making new ones as I go along. I also have some Arroway CDs, which are really fantastic. The garden wall and the house wall are Arroway's. I also try to archive all the models I make so that I can go back to them easily. The Thonet chair, for instance, I did about a year ago. The Eames lounge chair is also one of the first models I made (though I had to optimise it poly-wise for this render). The Brionvega is an old Nurbs model. As for plants, I have one Evermotion and a couple of XFrog collections I bought, plus a good bunch of free models I gleaned here and there on the web and from forums. I'd say half the trees here were downloaded for free (the XFrog public plant collection comes to mind). I did model one of the smaller trees too. I recommend XFrog, but not really the Evermotion models - they look fantastic but just way too big poly-wise for my taste.

    Hobo Joe: right, apart from perhaps the first image, which is intended to be distorted and stylised, I was indeed going for realism, and if it didn't turn out that way, it wasn't intended. Hence my interest in your comments to make sure I improve on this.

    tcrazy: Yes, the folds are a bit pronounced and also solid-looking, though I think I could have tackled that by scaling the texture a tad bigger and lowering the bump value. Right now it looks like ten dogs have spent the night in it.
    Yes, the grass is Vray displacement.
    And yes, I stole the inspiration from Archdaily (like a lot of other stuff before). The advantage is that they generally provide blueprints, which makes it easier to start with something quite close to the real proportions. Otherwise, I just take inspiration from books, ads, magazines... As I said, I'm still very much learning my way through this and I found that modelling and rendering from life was the best way to learn...
    Last edited by BbB; 24-Nov-08 at 05:01.



  16. #16
    Member andrewprice's Avatar
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    Please please please share your wrinkled cloth normal map!! (the one used on the bedset)
    It is amazing!!
    Could you also share how you did the furry blanket that lies over the top?

    Your renders are truly inspiring. Unlike most architectural renders, they also work as pieces of art, which as I hear the industry is leaning more and more towards.

    There are a few places where a darker shadow could be used as some of the objects appear to be floating (the chairs in the 3rd and 6th render). Or perhaps it's just the angle. I'm also not keen on the texture underneath the leather chair. The harsh bold lines seem a little out of place and unnatural, but if it's based off a real chair then I'll eat my words

    Keep up the good works! And again, could you please share your wrinkled cloth texture



  17. #17
    Member seanser's Avatar
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    Beautiful work as always. Great modeling, lighting, composition, the displacement mapping is really impressive, 5 star work surely.
    The Dude abides. Facebook



  18. #18
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    Thanks guys.

    Redbyte: Here's the wrinkles bump map. It's a modified texture from CGTextures.com (only half-res here because of forum limitations)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  19. #19
    That's wonderful work.

    The only 'critique' I have is the wood and cloth textures on the furniture are a bit large making them seem out of scale with the rest of the building. For example, the scale between the wood rings on the dining room table and the chairs around it gives the impression that the table is a lot smaller than it really is, kind of like an oversized coffee table or something. If you look at the rings around the chair legs and then compare them to the edge rings on the table you can see what I'm talking about.

    Yeah, I know a thing or two about wood...

    Other than that it's amazing.



  20. #20
    I've been wondering about something since I read of your problems with textures and memory usage: how do you actually manage your textures for a job like this? For example, with exterior shots of fully furnished houses I find that I need to resize the textures of interior objects by half or more to fit the scene into my 2 gigs of ram. But I've never done anything quite as texture heavy as this, though.



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