Car exercise and render engines test

Hey all. I’ve always wanted to make a render of a car, since it has never been my area so i’ve been working on this scene trying to achieve the same result in Cycles, Eevee, LuxCore and Radeon Pro Render just as a little exercise and have some general insight of what each engine had to offer, which one is more intuitive or faster. I tried to stay with the same type of lights and materials for each engine but I ended up getting slightly different results in the end. Octane for Blender 2.8 was also in the list I wanted to give a shot but it became really difficult to handle, too fiddly to my taste and not very intuitive at all. Also the lack of tutorials made it even harder for me to make anything similar to the other engines, so I decided not to include it in the end.

l didn’t model the car myself, this was just a fast test I wanted to do, but it ended up taking more time than I thought :joy:

My specs are:

  • GPU: GTX 1070 Zotac Amp Extreme edition
  • CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 2700x
  • Mem: 16gb Corsair DDR4 3200mhz
  • OS: Windows 10 64bits

Cycles

Eevee

LuxCore Render

Radeon Pro Render

Edit: A simple turn table also done with Eevee just for fun.

12 Likes

Very nice, personally I don’t like the strange reflections on glass in cycles. Other render engine doesn’t have this effect, but I don’t know if is more or less real than reality.
Prorender is a little too bright.

Everything seem really better on the luxcore output.
Highlight
Glass reflection
Reflection on seat behind the glass
Ground details
Back and front light.

It is not common for people to master lux so quickly even if i think it is a much simpler engine compared to other here.
Great job

For Octane look on " Final Result" channel on YouTube, this is very good starting point. Also on Nvidia channel are couple good tutorials, especially Lino Grandi. Also don’t hesitate to watch C4D tutorials…
There are difference, UI, integration, but principle are same. Octane is not more difficult than Lux Core for example. Have good caustic, fast volumetric and “free” displacement.

So it’s been a while since I posted this and lately I’ve been using Octane for Blender for a while and it’s great, specially fast. When I was testing what each engine had to offer by that time Octane was a pain to configure, but it has come a long way since then, so yeah I’m quite enjoying it right now.