Steve Jobs to sell Pixar?


(Clean3D) #1

Read.
http://money.cnn.com/2005/10/31/news/midcaps/pixar_disney/

I sure hope it doesn’t happen. Most (if not all) modern Disney films I’ve seen aren’t that great.

Or perhaps I’m misinterpreting this, I hope so.


(bmax) #2

The Toy Stories series was created by PIXAR in cooperation with Disney. Also, I don’t think much would change if Disney took over. After all, they don’t want to lose their viewers. PIXAR movies have been very popular, and if Disney’s management have their heads screwed on the right way, they’ll do everything to make it at least stay that way.


(WhiteBoy) #3

It doesn’t get any better than Pixar. Period. Honestly, I think they’d be better off without Disney. As the article stated, when the two companies were cooperating (they have since parted ways, from what I know) Disney was taking 50% of Pixar’s box office revenue simply for distributing their movies. I’m no expert, but I don’t think that’s quite fair.

I say if they can find someone else to market their products, they should do it. But who’s bigger than Disney? :expressionless:


(knellotron) #4

No, they were just partially funded and then distributed by Disney. They had no part in the production.


(Clean3D) #5

I read (I forget where) that Pixar is going to release “Cars” through Disney yet and then they’re going to separate. Of course, if this article actually turns out to be true then Pixar will be releasing everything through Disney.

More news.
http://thedisneyblog.typepad.com/tdb/pixar/


(osxrules) #6

I agree. I really hate it when big companies take loads of money for doing practically nothing and screwing over the little guy. It happens with actors too. But it’s hard to say how to value the appeal of a well known brand. Some people only buy a product if it has a certain name on it.

As it stands now, I think Pixar could go it alone now they’ve made a name for themselves in terms of branding. But there’s a lot of money comes from merchandising. I’m not sure but I wouldn’t think that they’d manufacture their own stuffed toys, pencil cases etc, wouldn’t they get Disney to do all that? In that respect taking 50% revenue might not be far off the mark.

That’s right and it’s not just about being big but big in the right line of business. I’m sure there are companies as big as Disney but I doubt they’d be able to do all the things that Disney can as easily like making toys and things.

What I’m not following is if Jobs is selling his shares in Pixar. He says he wants to go into a partnership but how could he if he gives up his shares?


(spike1907) #7

OK guys when was the last time you guys watched disney on TV. Believe me, they are really doing somthing wrong, or just have a realy sick view of what the real word is like.


(Falgor) #8

Disney usually makes only children’s and family movies, though they might have some jokes or references that only adults can understand, but those are not compareable to what Pixar/Dreamworks have in their films, like The Incredibles or, well, Shrek 2, which had so much parody of other films, and a lot more jokes that refer to something “grown-up”. If I’d use the word mature, I think it would be a bit wrong. Then again… Pixar is closer to Disney that Dreamworks… A lot closer.

So if Disney did buy Pixar, there would probably be a possibility of Pixar losing some of it’s edge. Anyway, IMO, Dreamworks has better films than Pixar.


(WhiteBoy) #9

I read (I forget where) that Pixar is going to release “Cars” through Disney yet and then they’re going to separate. Of course, if this article actually turns out to be true then Pixar will be releasing everything through Disney.

More news.
http://thedisneyblog.typepad.com/tdb/pixar/
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/31/business/31pixar.html[/quote]

They announced this seperation a long time ago. Disney and Pixar had a contract that said Pixar would make Disney a certain amount of fims. All the seperation meant is that they would split as soon as the contract expired–they weren’t going to renew it. Cars just happens to be that last film before the contract expires.

Unless, of course, Disnay buys Pixar. But I hope not.


(Alltaken) #10

totally unconfirmed news. but i heard that WETA was gonna buy PIXAR, DISNEY and DREAMWORKS.

heard it straight from the horses mouth.
i can’t reveal my sources. can’t reveal somthing that doesn’t exist

Alltaken


(Loken) #11

WETA? They obviously have a bit of cash given the success of LOTR and soon to be King Kong, as well as a few of the other films they’re working on, but I seriously, seriously doubt they have the capital to buy Pixar, Disney and Dreamworks, or let alone even one of them.

Disney alone would probably have to go for a near billion or more.


(toontje) #12

Well, what Micheal Dukakis was for the democratic party, was Micheal Eisner for Disney.

He’s just a d*ckhead, and Steve Jobs broke negotiations with Disney. Disney wanted too much. They had a contract for 5 movies. Cars would be the last.
One thing Disney has going is direct access to a very lucrative market and brandname recognition. At first Pixar was this relativly small software company/ animation studio that had a wacky idea to release the very first full length CG movie. Disney took a lot of risk to venture with these guys. But now the tables are turned. Half of the revenue of Disney comes from Pixar movies. I surely don’t hope that Disney takes Pixar over. I’m fed up with those lets-make-a-quick-buck-and-scew-quality straight to video releases. It is fine for their market (todlers, kindergarten folks), but the art will be lost.

I don’t know who said that PDI dreamworks is better than Pixar… but then you must have found Antz better than Bugs Life and Shark Tale better than Finding Nemo.
The only thing PDI has going for them is Shrek, and by that I mean only Shrek, not Shrek 2, which was a total disappointment. Excellent animation, excellent directing, excellent visuals, but the story was CRAP! It is like multiplying with 0. It is all about the story, and then comes the story. And that is why Pixar always comes on top.

But I’m holding my breath for Cars though. Hope it will not be their first flop. I mean, you need at least some kind of limbs to convey emotions, and not only faces on objects… but then again, if you can make a tricycle feel nostalgic, or a lamp curiour, you can do anything.


(Clean3D) #13

Yeah, I’m curious how Cars is going to turn out too. I’m pretty sure that Pixar will be able to convey quite a range of emotions (even with limited resources), but a story aobut cars? Well…it’s going to be interesting to see how they pull this one off.

BTW, good news!
http://pixaranimation.blogspot.com/2005/11/pixar-for-saleat-right-price.html


(noxioux) #14

I think if Pixar did come more firmly under Disney, it would only degrade or destroy a perfectly good franchise. Sure Disney’s a big market force. But most of what they’re doing these days is pure and total crap.

On the other hand, if Disney were to reform themselves and become more like Pixar (in terms of what they’re producing), it would be a good thing. It’s really tough to watch something you loved as a kid get turned into lumpy raw sewage.

The nice thing about the Pixar crew is that they are true craftsmen. Like the Disney people used to be. What I mean by that, is that they take meticulous care with what they’re producing, and their productions have a timeless quality. Like all that old Disney stuff.

I think ol’ Walt is spinning in his grave. I would be.


(Katt) #15

don’t worry everyone, Lucasfilms will buy them all. :smiley: *

*negated truth


(toontje) #16

It’s a shame. Disney is run by financial and marketing managers. I think that Disney should be run by artists again. Roy Disney being pissed off at Micheal Eisner says a lot too.


(paroneayea) #17

The truth is that I’m buying all of them. I’m also buying the Blender Foundation, which includes Studio Orange.

So what am I going to do with all these places? Let me tell you: monkeys in hats. That’s the money right there.


(JD-multi) #18

The thing I miss of disney the last few years is actually where they started with.
When I was a child, you could see complete work in progress videos of movies in the make, complete videos about how they started, talking with the artists. I still know the making of video of “Notre Dame” It was great, or the making of “Lion King” and seeing all those artists doing some sketching and blow away the adience with the amazing results. Also technics where shown and much much more. And when the movie came out I went too see how the final result was, amazing, how they draw it, the cool stuff, just awesome :slight_smile:

That’s what I miss today, no sketches, no making off’s or lag in videos of them, no cool interviews with technics being shown, no. Boring videos of bla bla, trailer en movie that’s all. Sad, sure they make nice things now also, but the things that made me looking forwards to view that movie, I just miss that.

It’s sad to see that Disney who had the fame of discovering each few months a cool new technic on making cartoon movies, showing awesome drawings and such, is now being bussy with finance. Omg
I feel really disappointed, I hope they change this soon. :-?


(William) #19

don’t worry everyone, Lucasfilms will buy them all. *

You know Pixar actually spun off Lucasfilm in the 80s? [/quote]


(Marty_D) #20

:slight_smile: I think you may have that backwards. Lucasfilm spun off it’s research divisions, one of which eventually became Pixar.

A quick link here (one of many found at Google)
http://www.fudco.com/habitat/archives/000021.html

The Graphics Group became a company that was eventually called Pixar (“Pixar” was originally the name of a piece of hardware they had been developing, but the name ended up getting tacked onto the company because nobody could agree on another name they liked better). Pixar got sold off to Steve Jobs, who had the technology savvy, steely nerves, deep pockets and general megalomania needed to see it through to maturity. They eventually figured out that their biggest assets included not just their technology but John Lasseter, and the rest of that story you probably know. George (or perhaps his accountant) no doubt wishes now that he’d hung onto a bigger piece.