Tentacles of the Deep

Disclaimer: I am using Google Translate.

Hello lovely person!

My first publication here of one of the studies I have been doing on this beloved Blender. To make it clear, I recently studied 3D, and now I decided to share my short experimentation projects here. Why not?

I was exploring the Displace Modifier, in an attempt to understand its possibilities, how “heavy” it would be to use it and its characteristics as a whole. For this I decided to set up a simple scene. Well then, man! This modifier is really wonderful, and I was quite surprised by the results directly on the mesh, so fast and easily editable. I’m thrilled! hahaha.

This is the final scene.

I created and rendered the scene in Blender version 2.91.0, with Cycles. I used some mixtures through the Nodes to generate a simple material to help the visual of the tentacles. Amazingly, the colors of the scene were inspired by Raspberry, blueberry and their respective leaves for the background green.

Here they are:



If you happen to be interested in lighting planning, here it is:

After that I generated masks for Cryptomatte, to help me with a quick manipulation in photoshop.

And only on PS I created these particles and fumes, I adjusted contrasts and sharpness, because it was not my focus to generate them in Blender, and also because my video card is an AMD RX 480 with problems. So I’m “taking it easy”. hahaha!

The process in Photoshop you can follow below:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1DvgR7KhXOVrvc8upuALZ96DEupsIilgK/view?usp=sharing

Then that’s it! Please feel free to criticize my scene.
See you!

3 Likes

I think it has become a pretty good image! I like the gore/horror mood. Seems like you really dug deep into the materials. Congrats on finishing this one! :monkey_face: :+1:t4:

I wondered what is Cryptomatte and how did you achieve this sort of color separation?

1 Like

Hello Marlon!
Thanks for the comment. Well then, you would like to know what Cryptomatte is, right? It basically takes advantage of the information of your object in the scene to generate a mask, which are these “color separations” as you wrote. Blender generates this automatically. How to do this? You just need to check it in the “Layer Properties / Cryptomatte panel”. And then activate it in the Compositor. To make it easier to understand, CG Boost’s Zach explains this very well in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ml1Kic4VopA

This “Tool” is worth learning, as post-production is incredibly faster. Of course, I’m new to using 3D, so Cryptomatte may do a lot more, but my knowledge so far is limited to that.

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Hey, cool, thank you very much! This might might by handy for a lot of cases where you have to do pst-processing on images. Thanks! :monkey_face: :+1:t4:

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I’m glad I helped you. hahahah