Tips improving my scene


#1

Hi, i’m currently making this scene and i need some help, i’ve been working on this for a while but i have the sense that this needs something else.

I have a Sun light lighting this scene besides the fires and it’s set on filmic on color management. (do not mind the eyes of that skull, i still have to texture them)

Any tips?


(nancycat) #2

I’d say the sun is too bright. The fires are almost invisible and don’t seem to be lighting anything.


#3

i’ve been doing some changes, what about now?


(nancycat) #4

Wow! MUCH better.


#5

Yay! thanks. Now let’s see if i can improve it a little bit more.


(sundialsvc4) #6

Agree, much better.

But remember – those torches are "practical lights." They are things in-frame which the human mind knows to be “sources of light.” However, they should not be the only light sources in the actual scene. For example, the area above the creature’s horns and the right side of his body needs proper exposure, and you probably don’t want any area of the frame (especially, a large percentage of it) to be completely black (nor white). If that box is important, it must be both clearly lit and subtly emphaized. The space below the altar especially can’t be pure-dark.

You do want the creature, and maybe the creature’s eyes (which should have a “catch light”), to be the center of attention and therefore the center of lighting, with every other part of the scene’s composition leading your eyes straight to … its evil eyes and teeth.

The final effect should be that a histogram display shows a generally bell-shaped curve with no “hard spikes” anywhere. (Read about Ansel Adams’ “Zone System.”) The final lighting setup should plausibly look like the lighting is coming from those various torches, but you’ll never get things right if you actually depend on them for scene illumination.

“The actor walks on stage and flips the light switch. An on-stage lamp turns on, and, high above the stage, corresponding theatrical lights brighten.” That lamp’s emitting light, yes, but it’s not the [only, or main] thing that’s actually lighting the set. Up there in the loft, “there are lights all over the place.”