VR sculpting discussion

[Virtual Reality sculpting discussion moved from a different topic…]

VR would be cool, but no thanks for longer session than one hour LOL

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A few weeks ago I’ve played with the Oculus Quest 2 of a friend of mine. I loved it. 3D sculpting needs getting used to, but I can lively imagine VR might become the future of 3D creation.

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You’ll get headhaches, VR vision is more intensive asking for more effort because it’s really not natural vision.
Not saying it’s bad, but for me VR sculpting is a side tool, can be fun, or for some things can be better, but it will never become a main tool for my use.

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:slightly_smiling_face: I’m sure VR headgear will become lighter and the displays easier on the eyes.

Maybe it’s because I’m getting old and curmudgeonly, but I just can’t get all that excited for VR. It’s neat, sure, but with standard setups, you don’t risk getting immersed in your work, then accidentally running face first into a wall.

I mean you’ll always have micro screen at some centimers near eyes, so even more direct lighting to eyes, and the way your vision interprets VR 3D depth asks you more lot more effort than some exteriror flat screen.
Even headset as light as googles starting appearing, those requirements and how VR works remain.

Anyway you’ll tell me after using VR continuously some hours doing 3D work, but perhaps you are among some people that are ok with long time session VR.
While i would be glad to have Blender getting even more VR.

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I expect VR to evolve to techniques likes projections on your eyes, in stead of having to focus on external screens near your eyes.

How would it even possible?

A low powered laser could be used to project an image directly onto your retina. I wouldn’t expect to see this tech in consumer VR headgears anytime soon though, for a number of reasons.

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I have never tried VR for sculpting but I wonder if the drawback would be the lack of tactile sensation. I can only imagine it starting to feel incredibly weird and deadening to be working at something in front of me in a life like way and not being able to touch the surface or feel the materials in my hands. It seems to me it could open up a whole new world of frustration and feel more of a gimmick rather than radically advance the practice of digital sculpting.

But who knows where it would lead.

It’s certainly great for directly visualising 3D digital creations and environments in a virtual real world context. VR is fascinating in so many ways. But I am not sure I would want to be doing demanding detailed work with a head set or googles immersed a VR environment for many hours of a day. It’s important surely to always step back as well and look away from the work regularly to keep a sense of balance and perspective and have a chance to refocus the eyes.

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Hell, NO. NO. NO.

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Hahaha. :grin: I’m sure once a projection technique has been approved for public use, it will not be harmful to your eyes.

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When I played with the Oculus Rift 2, I worked with Gravity Sketch. The nice thing about it is the ‘real’ 3D impression. You’re creating in an immersive, spatial 3D environment in stead of looking at just a flat screen.

But I agree that the tactile aspect is missing, and I would also welcome being able to use your hands and fingers to sculpt in stead of the two controllers. I’m looking forward to trying Nomad Sculpt on an iPad + Apple Pencil to have the feeling of your input device really touching a 3D surface. I’ve owned a 27 inch Wacom Cintiq for a while, but I disliked its bad ergonomics, pen input lag, no convenient place to reach your keyboard and more inconveniences.

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You got 3DCoat, Blender, and a desktop computer. Why are you even considering Nomad?

Maybe you tablet sucks.

Beyond the video it is nice working on a 4K 120Hz monitor when drawing and sculpting. I never feel any neck pain either. If you go for a tablet with no screen try Huion as the pen pressure feel is way better than xp pen. xp pen seems to take a little bit before it starts working. If using it with 4K screen go with a big tablet as you need it so it is smoother in 4k.

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Jeez, that guy in the video is annoying. :sweat_smile: But thanks for the advice.

I’ve got a medium-size Wacom Intuos Pro and a 4K BenQ screen, and I’m very satisfied with it. I just like to try Nomad Sculpt, and there isn’t a desktop version yet. And of course once I’ve got an iPad again (used to have several models, starting with the first) I’ll use it for other purposes too. An advantage would be that I can take the tablet along with me to my dad, then continue sculpting there, in stead of watching boring TV at his place. :wink:

Regarding a large-sized tablet: I used to work with the A3-size Wacom Intuos Pro, but I discovered that I like the medium size better.

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A reason tablet without screen is sometimes better, is you don’t have your hand on the screen hidding stuff, sometimes you need to keep an overall view when sculpting details.
But both have their own advantages.

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A summary of VR sculpting programs I’ve found.
Kodon
Gravity Sketch
Kanova
Oculus/Adobe Medium
Adobe Substance 3D Modeler

Of all of them Adobe Substance 3D Modeler looks like it is going to be the best. Medium is second if you can use it on you vr set. 3rd is Kodon with some tools that seems really good. Kodon is a little glitchy now. Gravity Sketch and Kanova are free, but have major flaws.

There really is no great VR Sculpting program out now. There is so much potential with new tools that could be developed that would be far beyond anything possible with a tablet. One day we will get there.

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Sure, but I first had a tablet and now have a screen tablet. If I want the benefits of both I just mirror the screen tablet to one of my monitors. The precision in drawn lines when high precision is needed is much better for me when I can see where I’m drawing, though the difference for me is bigger while drawing than sculpting.

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I don’t see why Substance modeler would be better than Medium ?
Medium is like 3D coat , voxel free way sculpting

While Substance Modeler is like MagicaCSG, you use primitives you can deform, do boolean, and paint merging where you want.
So same big limitations and constraints for Substance Modeler, very different from common free surface or voxel sculpting.

Modeler is actually based on the same SDF (voxel) engine as Medium, with improved performance and additional tools like the booleans/primitive workflow you mention. Anything you can do with Medium you’ll be able to do with Modeler.

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