Growing increasingly frustrated...

I am still having zero luck. I guess everything I create will just have to be one color %| . All I ever wanted to do was create two blocks and have them be two different colors but I guess this is even too much to expect. I really had my mind set on learning how to use this great tool but if I can’t even advance beyond this elementary stage, what’s the point?. I’ve tried everything that was suggested to me and spent half the night trying to get it right, read a number of tutorials (including 2 videos), etc so it’s not like I’m just “too lazy” to learn this on my own. Any suggestions?. Can anyone point me to a tutorial specifically about this?. How about a one-on-one chat to guide me through this?. I am willing to learn but right now, it’s just not “happening” for me.

  • Regards

I’m sorry you’re having difficulties. To make objects different colors you have to create and assign them materials. Can you post screen shots of what you’ve done so far so we can see where you need help? What tutorials and videos have you seen?

Documentation. Go. Read.

Should answer in all of your questions. I you have no luck. Ask again later.

Thank’s for responding Debugged…

I don’t even know where to begin. I think maybe I need to set my paths up under “preferences” or something because that’s what I did before and was able to get several things working. Even when I follow the latest video tutorials at: http://www.blender3d.org/cms/Video_Tutorials.396.0.html it still does’nt work even though I’m following them step by step and thinking “hmmm…now why does it work for HIM but not for ME?”. I’ve watched the first three “getting started” videos so far.

Another problem I’m having which I believe is related to my paths not being set correctly (or at all) is that when I use “file>append” to locate and select a material ("ie; candystripe) I am unable to find it in the little “MA:” menu under “materials” so that it can be applied to my model. For example, I don’t know (but need to know) what paths should be used for the following (under preferences)…

  • YFexport
  • Fonts
  • Render
  • Textures
  • Sounds

Anyway, here’s hoping I can finally get resolved and once again, I appreciate ALL the help I can get:)

Yes, I know I can read through thousands of pages of documentation but I am asking here (in this forum) to hopefully save myself a great deal of time and because I prefer live, human interaction where specific questions can be asked and answered as opposed to pouring over pages of manuals. I did read a lot and did a search prior to coming here and that is why I am here now - because I was unable to find the answer I needed.

From another thread:

  1. Textures are assigned to materials so to have 2 textures on different parts of the mesh you need to have two materials. The first material you assign will occupy all the verts of the mesh. In F9, the Links and Materials tab will display this in the Links Inddex box as 1:Mat:1. To add another material index click “New” and the index will change to 2:Mat:2 which means 2 materials indexed and you are viewing index 2. Click the arrow on the left and it will change to 2:Mat:1 which means you are viewing index 1 (the original one).
    In the 3D window Tab into edit mode and select the verts that you want to assign to the second index (2:Mat:2) and click “Assign” which will assign the new material to index 2. If you have given your materials unique colors and good names you can now go to the materials buttons (F5) and click the 2 in the Materials datablock and make it Single user, and change to 1st index and do the same. The name and color will show as you change the index.
    If this is assigned wrong you can go to F5 and from the materials datablock and change the index there, delete the material with X and assign the correct one from the menu (up/down arrows).
    Now you can select which material you want (which area of the mesh) and assign a texture to that and it will only map to verts occupied by that material.

%<

are your 2 blocks separate objects ? can you select them independantly in object mode ?

This is a good question. Often new users of Blender create additional meshes while in Edit Mode. This makes the second object and the first object a single object. If this is the case, and you can’t select them individually from Object Mode, then you need to seperate the objects.

This can be accomplished by going into Edit Mode (Tab key). Make sure the Vertex Select Mode is selected (the icon to the right of the lock icon), and that Limit Selection to Visible is not selected (the little shaded cube icon … this icon is only visible if you are in Solid Mode. If you don’t see the cube icon, then you don’t have to worry about it). Now select the vertices of the second object if they aren’t already selected (right mouse click individual vertices or use the Box Select tool … B hotkey). You then select Mesh -> Vertices -> Separate (or use the P hotkey). Now when you Tab out of Edit Mode, you can select the second object. If you have trouble selecting the vertices of the second object while in Edit Mode, then I advise you to reread the first chapters of the documentation.

If you now have separate objects, then you should be able to follow the steps as outlined in Fligh %'s post.

Ok, I was just about ready to give up on Blender completely thinking that maybe it just was’nt “me” or was beyond my capabilities. Anyway, here is exactly how I’m doing this thing…

First I start with a fresh screen
Then I do an ADD>MESH>CUBE (my first cube)
Then I do a second ADD>MESH>CUBE (my second cube)

Now since the second cube is hiding behind the first I do a MESH>TRANSFORM>GRAB/MOVE and then proceed to move the first cube from behind the original one.

So now I have two cubes side-by-side.

I do all of this in the EDIT mode and I can right-click on either cube and see the yellow hi-lighting. Now when I do a VERTICES>SEPARATE, it does separate the two blocks but I can only add color to the original one and am unable to even SELECT the second one.

I hope I’m making sense here

LEAVE EDIT MODE BEFORE ADDING SECOND CUBE.
It’s a basic Blender protocol you might as well learn now.

%<

If I leave the edit mode, what mode should I be in before creating rthe second cube?

If I leave the edit mode, what mode should I be in before creating rthe second cube?[/quote]

Whenever you create an object, press TAB to get out of Edit Mode.. This will put you back into object mode. Create your new object from there. Read my post above to learn how to separate an object that was created while in edit mode.

Be patient. Learning Blender can be a real challenge, but once you are used to it, the work flow can be quite amazing. I highly recommend that you read the docs and do as many tutorials as you can get your hands on. Most of all, don’t let yourself get frustrated. Walk away from it for a little while. Then come back and try again. Don’t try to take too big a bite at once. That route is where frustration lives.

To Dyeater

You are sooooo right about just “walking away” and allowing your mind to refresh itself and not trying to learn everything all at once. I had just thrown a pity party for myself, telling myself that “well, even though the Blender thing did’nt work out, just think about all of the other things you’ve managed to get done lately…blah…blah”. I had all but decided to move on and do something else for a hobby. The thing is (and not to brag) I have breezed through a very large number of complex projects over the years with flying colors but 3D is one area that has always managed to stump me.

Anyway, some good news here. I followed your advice about using the object mode and now I have two different colored blocks. One green and the other, red. Just perfect for Christmas! :smiley: :smiley: :smiley:

I still would be interested in knowing what paths to use for those things I menrtioned in my recent post though as I feel that I’m not able to access certain materials because the paths are not set. I’m using Fedora Linux (Core 3) on Gnome.

Thank’s again Folks:)

Simplest way of accomplishing what you want:

Create a new cube as you usually do. It will show the vertices (little points on the corners. Yellow means they are selected ). This is edit mode. Hit the tab key. This is object mode. It’s wireframe should now be pink with no vetices showing (still selected). hit the letter A. It should now be black (unselected). Still with no vertices showing. Move your 3d cursor where you want a new cube to be by pressing the left mouse button in the 3D window at that location. Create a new cube as you usually do. Blender will automatically put the new cube into edit mode again. Press A to switch back to object mode. The new cube should now be pink. You can right click back and forth on the cubes to select and deselect them. Press A to select both and deselect both (toggles select/deselect all). Now select one (RMB) and go to materials buttons (F5). Use the add new button under materials. Use the color sliders to make a new color. When you are happy select the other cube (RMB) and make a new material the same way as above. Hitting Z will toggle solid view on and off so that you can see your material applied to the cubes.

Things to remember: Two basic modes in mesh editing (there are other modes that aren’t that important at this point) Edit and Object. Tab toggles between them. Edit allows you to manipulate the shape and form of an object on a vertex/face/edge level. (that’s why in edit mode you can see the vertices and select them individually. Object mode allows you to manipulate the object as a whole (ie. assign material, resize, rotate, move around in scene quickly). If you add a mesh while in object mode it becomes a seperate object. This makes isolating it from others for editing and positioning and assigning materials to it etc. easier. If you add a mesh while in edit mode it will become part of the current object. Try it and then tab into object mode. These two meshes will select, scale, move, etc. as one.

For what it’s worth as you learn the more advenced tools you can join and seperate objects, assign materials to just certain areas of objects (groups of vertices) isolate meshes of the same object while in edit mode, apply scale, rotation, location changes in edit modes as well as object mode, etc. Blender offers a huge amount of flexibility in this area. As you progress you will develop a workflow that suits your needs. The best way to learn (aside from reading the docs) is to keep in mind what I said in the preceding paragraph and just experiment with the tools in different modes. Maybe tackle a tutorial or two. In the mean time, keep one hand on the keyboard, the other on the mouse and chin up. It gets easier! :stuck_out_tongue:

As for the paths. Blender doesn’t really care where you keep stuff (with the exception of scripts. It needs to be able to find them for them to show up in the menus. If you want to be really organized you can set up directories (in you home directory) for things like texture maps, sounds, and set the paths to them. This will make locating them easier as Blender wil know where to start. Also where you want video renders to output to is a good one to set. Tthis will help you find finished renders later on. You can also tell blender where the fonts on you system are stored so that you don’t have to hunt for them everytime. None of this is neccessary though.

The Append command:

Materials are created in the blend file. EXternal textures (images files) can be loaded from there no matter where they actually are. The append command is used to grab materials (meshes, lights, anything really) created in other blend files and make them part of the current one. The paths have nothing to do with it. Using the append command, locate the .blend file that you want to re-use the material (or other assets) from and you can browse through it’s assets by type and name. Find what you want and hit “load library”. Kind of like opening part of another file within the current one. When you save the current file this appended material will now be part of it’s asset library as well.

To Fly3D and others here…

I just successfully used append and some of the effects are mind-blowing…WOW!!. Funny how you can go days with Murphy’s law hanging over your shoulder and then one day for no explainable reason, everything just sort of seems to come together and work.

Again, thank’s. You people have been awesomely helpful:)

One big suggestion: try to walk before you run.

I’ve holding myself back from just diving in and see what I can get working in Blender. I decided right away that I needed to study Blender to get really comfortable with it. You really should work your way through at least the first few chapters of the Blender manual (online available or as book) because it will introduce you to the concepts behind the user interface, the key combinations and the workflow that Blender is designed at. I’m at this stage myself right now and it already has lifted my perspective on the program from ‘being difficult to master’ to ‘a powerfull application that has a very thought-out user interface’. Just trying to figure out stuff by accident is very much hit and mis in a complicated program like Blender.

This is a good question. Often new users of Blender create additional meshes while in Edit Mode. This makes the second object and the first object a single object. If this is the case, and you can’t select them individually from Object Mode, then you need to seperate the objects.

This can be accomplished by going into Edit Mode (Tab key). Make sure the Vertex Select Mode is selected (the icon to the right of the lock icon), and that Limit Selection to Visible is not selected (the little shaded cube icon … this icon is only visible if you are in Solid Mode. If you don’t see the cube icon, then you don’t have to worry about it). Now select the vertices of the second object if they aren’t already selected (right mouse click individual vertices or use the Box Select tool … B hotkey). You then select Mesh -> Vertices -> Separate (or use the P hotkey). Now when you Tab out of Edit Mode, you can select the second object. If you have trouble selecting the vertices of the second object while in Edit Mode, then I advise you to reread the first chapters of the documentation.

If you now have separate objects, then you should be able to follow the steps as outlined in Fligh %'s post.[/quote]

Aaaaahhh!!! Thank you!!! Good to know this!!! That must be why Boolean wasn’t working!!!

Booleans can only be done in:

object mode

-with-

two objects selected.

and just as a note, try to avoid using booleans. they tend to cause a mesh to become very messy and very difficult to subsurf.

for instance:

http://img80.exs.cx/img80/332/Booleans.jpg

this was done with [difference] on a standard cube and a 32X32 UVsphere, with the cube selected first.

and DONT give up learing Blender!

~Delta

The advice not to use booleans unless you have to is a good one. If you do need to use booleans, try this script. It works better than the one currently in Blender. I have no doubt that Blender boolean operations will soon be improved.

Just right click the above link and “Save as” … I’m sure you know the drill :slight_smile:

This is the link to the thread where the script is talked about:

https://blenderartists.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=29200&start=0&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=